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21st-Jan-2011 04:37 pm - The Fighter Trailer
fun


Based on a true story. Recommended. DVD would be okay.
zen
SATURDAY

4th-Dec-2009 04:35 pm - Word of the day: leviathan (noun)
oh
SATURDAY

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leviathan • \luh-VYE-uh-thun\ • noun
1 : the political state; especially : a totalitarian state having a vast bureaucracy
*2 : something large or formidable

Example Sentence:
Towering leviathans of the forest, these giant sequoias often reach heights of more than 200 feet.

Did you know?</b>
Old Testament references to a huge sea monster, "Leviathan" (in Hebrew, "Liwyāthān"), are thought to spring from an ancient myth in which the god Baal slays a multiheaded sea monster. Leviathan appears in the book of Psalms, as a sea serpent that is killed by God and then given as food to the Hebrews in the wilderness, and it is referred to in the book of Job as well. We began equating "Leviathan" with the political state after the philosopher Thomas Hobbes used the word in (and as the title of) his 1651 political treatise on government. Today, "Leviathan" often suggests a crushing political bureaucracy. "Leviathan" can also be immensely useful as a general term meaning "something monstrous or of enormous size."

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.
14th-Nov-2009 08:01 pm - Word of the day: bark (noun)
tehehe
SATURDAY

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Main Entry: bark
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse bark-, bǫrkr; akin to Middle Dutch & Middle Low German borke bark
Date: 14th century

A candy containing chocolate and nuts that is made in a sheet and broken into piece
8th-Nov-2009 01:02 am - Word of the day: sacerdotal (adj.)
oh
SUNDAY

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sacerdotal • \sass-er-DOH-tul\ • adjective
*1 : of or relating to priests or a priesthood : priestly
2 : of, relating to, or suggesting religious belief emphasizing the powers of priests as essential mediators between God and mankind

Example Sentence:
It surprised Jim whenever Father Thomas would shed his sacerdotal role to take up a secular topic of conversation such as contemporary rock music.

Did you know?
"Sacerdotal" is one of a host of English words derived from the Latin adjective "sacer," meaning "sacred." Other words derived from "sacer" include "desecrate," "sacrifice," "sacrilege," "consecrate," "sacrament," and even "execrable" (developed from the Latin word "exsecrari," meaning "to put under a curse"). One unlikely "sacer" descendant is "sacrum," referring to the series of five vertebrae in the lower back connected to the pelvis. In Latin this bone was called the "os sacrum," or "holy bone," a translation of the Greek "hieron osteon."

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.
7th-Sep-2009 07:39 am - Word of the day: ripsnorter (noun)
fun
MONDAY

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ripsnorter • \RIP-SNOR-ter\ • noun
: something extraordinary : humdinger

Example Sentence:
"Inevitably, good and evil clash in a ripsnorter of a final battle, but along the way, there is action, adventure, danger, comic relief and -- always -- very good eating." (Sue Corbette, The Miami Herald, January 22, 1999)

Did you know?
English speakers of the mid-19th century already had the term "snorter" at their disposal if they wanted a colorful term for something extraordinary, but that didn't stop speakers in the U.S. from throwing the verb "rip" onto the front of the word to create "ripsnorter." And they didn't stop there: By the time the 20th century had reached its quarter mark, U.S. speakers had added "hummer," "humdinger" (probably an alteration of "hummer"), "pip" (from "pippin," a kind of crisp, tart apple and a term for a highly admirable person or thing), and "doozy" (thought to be an alteration of "daisy") to the catalog of words for the striking or extraordinary.
26th-Aug-2009 07:31 pm - Word of the day: dead hand (noun)
eek
WEDNESDAY

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dead hand • \DED-HAND\ • noun
1 : an inalienable possession of property by a church or corporation
*2 : the oppressive influence of the past

Example Sentence:
"If newspapers wish to survive," said Edward, "then editors need to wrest free from the dead hand of print journalism and embrace the more dynamic capabilities of the Web."

Did you know?
Does "dead hand" make you picture a pale dismembered hand creeping slowly toward its next unsuspecting victim? If so, you're in for a surprise -- but not a scary one. "Dead hand" is a literal translation of the etymology of an older English word, "mortmain," which comes from the Old French words "morte" (meaning "dead") and "main" (meaning "hand"). In very unspooky terms, the words describe property that is left to a company, church, or charity in perpetuity. The "oppressive past influence" sense of both "mortmain" and "dead hand" developed from the idea of the dead exercising posthumous control over their property by dictating how it must be used after they die.

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.
20th-Aug-2009 07:11 pm - Word of the day: contemn (verb)
oh
THURSDAY

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contemn • \kun-TEM\ • verb
: to view or treat with contempt : scorn

Example Sentence:
Jacob believes that any rational scientist must contemn theories of magic and the supernatural.

Did you know?
"Contemn" is derived from the Latin verb "contemnere," a word formed by combining "con-" and "temnere" ("to despise").
Surprisingly, our verb may have come within a hair's breadth of being spelled "contempn." The Middle French word "contempner" arrived in Middle English as "contempnen," but that extra "p" disappeared, leaving us with "contemn." You may be wondering about the connection between "contemn" and "contempt," and not surprisingly, they are related. "Contempt" comes from Latin "contemptus," which comes from "contemnere." "Contemn" first turned up in print in the 15th century; "contempt" dates from the 14th century.
12th-Aug-2009 07:35 am - Word of the day: dernier cri (noun)
tehehe
TUESDAY

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dernier cri • \dairn-yay-KREE\ • noun
: the newest fashion

Example Sentence:
When it came to shopping for a new wardrobe for school, Jacqueline tended to ignore the dernier cri and would instead pick clothes that suited her own tastes.

Did you know?
Paris has long been the last word in fashion, but hot designer clothes from the city's renowned runways aren’t the only stylish French exports. Words, too, sometimes come with a French label. "Dernier cri," literally "last cry," is one such chic French borrowing. The word is no trendy fad, however. More than a century has passed since "dernier cri" was the latest thing on the English language scene (and cut-steel jewelry was declared the dernier cri by the Westminster Gazette of December 10, 1896), but the term (unlike cut-steel) remains as modish as ever. Other fashionable French words have walked the runways of the English language since then: "blouson" (1904); "couture" (1908); "culotte" (1911); "lamé" (a clothing fabric, 1922); and "bikini" (1947), to name a few.
10th-Aug-2009 11:09 am - Word of the day: expatiate (verb)
oh
SATURDAY

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expatiate • \ek-SPAY-shee-ayt\ • verb
1 : to move about freely or at will : wander
*2 : to speak or write at length or in detail

Example Sentence:
The middle schoolers grew restless as Mr. Donald expatiated on Pluto's classification as a dwarf planet.

Did you know?
The Latin antecedent of "expatiate" is "exspatiari," which combines the prefix "ex-" ("out of") with "spatiari" ("to take a walk"), itself from "spatium" ("space" or "course"). "Exspatiari" means "to wander from a course" and, in the figurative sense, "to digress."
But when English speakers began using "expatiate" in 1538, we took "wander" as simply "to move about freely." In a similar digression from the original Latin, we began using "expatiate" in a figurative sense of "to speak at length." That's the sense of the word most often used these days, usually in combination with "on" or "upon."

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.
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